Wednesday, July 25, 2007

Biblical Contradictions

A part of me feels a bit confused over the meaning of “truth” when it comes to the bible. I study the bible, yet I find contradictions within the scriptures of each passage and book. I solely rely on the bible, yet I have different interpretations of particular matters.

For instance, in Romans 7:1, it states, “Now, dear brothers and sisters---you who are familiar with the law---don’t you know that the law applies only to a person who is still living?”

Then, if you read on to verse 4, it states, “So this is the point: The law no longer holds you in its power, because you died to its power when you died with Christ on the cross.”

Then you have this passage:
“You and I are Jews by birth, not ‘sinners’ like the Gentiles. And yet we Jewish Christians know that we become right with God, not by doing what the law commands, but by faith in Jesus Christ. So we have believed in Christ Jesus, that we might be accepted by God because of our faith in Christ-and not because we have obeyed the law. For no one will ever be saved by obeying the law.” ~Galatians 2:15-16

So if no one will ever be saved by obeying the law, then how can Christians and preachers tell us that if we don’t obey the law, then we’ll end up in eternal damnation? Which one is the truth? Which laws still apply today? If Jesus took away the law by dying up on the cross, isn’t that the truth?

Wine produces mockers; liquor leads to brawls. Whoever is led astray by drink cannot be wise. ~Proverbs 20:1
The opposing scriptures:
And it is not for kings, O Lemuel, to guzzle wine. Rulers should not crave liquor. For if they drink, they may forget their duties and be unable to give justice to those who are oppressed. Liquor is for the dying, and wine is for those in deep depression. Let them drink to forget their poverty and remember their troubles no more. ~Proverbs 31:4-7

So drinking wine is good for depression? Isn’t alcohol a depressant?

Even so, I have noticed one thing, at least, that is good. It is good for people to eat well, drink a good glass of wine, and enjoy their work—whatever they do under the sun—for however long God lets them live. ~Ecclesiastes 5:18

Don’t drink only water. You ought to drink a little wine for the sake of your stomach because you are sick so often. ~1 Timothy 23

I do realize that everything in moderation is key, but tell that to an alcoholic who’s recovering. One drink is enough to push them off the wagon.

Didn’t Jesus make water into wine?

There’s another contradiction to what the Catholics believe, as opposed to what some Christians may believe, which is talking in tongues. In Corinthians 12, it states that God gives the ability to speak in unknown languages, and another is given the ability to interpret what is being said. It is the one and only Holy Spirit who distributes these gifts.

I’ve gone to a spirit-filled church before, and I have experienced one person talking in tongues, and then another person translating what the message said to everyone. It was the first time I have ever witnessed this. I didn’t know what to think. At first, I was taken aback, but then I was really fascinated by it all. Why do some people of faith believe this, and others do not? It’s in the bible, so it has to be true, right?

What about name-calling?

Matthew 32:17 (Jesus says) “Blind fools!”

Opposing scripture:
But I say, if you are angry with someone, you are subject to judgment! If you call someone an idiot, you are in danger of being brought before the high council. And if you curse someone, you are in danger of the fires of hell. ~Matthew 5:22

There are other contradictions, such as, God is cruel, unmerciful, destructive, and ferocious [Jer 13:14 / Deut 7:16 / 1 Sam 15:2,3 / 1 Sam 6:19]
God is kind, merciful, and good [James 5:11 / Lam 3:33 / 1 Chron 16:34 / Ezek 18:32 / Ps 145:9 / 1 Tim 2:4 / 1 John 4:16 / Ps 25:8]

Which description fits God best? What are we to believe? People have so many views, beliefs, as well as questions.

How can it be just one truth?

20 comments:

ty said...

my answer is yes...very.
the bible says all these things are sin...including incest..
but..if adam and eve created all...then we are all brother and sister...and so therefore we are all born into sin...so then...what makes any sin worse than the next....and no matter what position in life you take...u are born into sin...and the second you create a child u are sinning again...i don't know...just what i think...

Enemy of the Republic said...

Ty brings up an interesting point---never thought of humankind that way-wow! I will write a better comment soon, but here is a brief synopsis: I think the nature of truth is contradictory. There is much in the Bible that troubles me, but oddly enough, not the seemingly contradictory statements. I can give a scholarly answer of traditions using different sources, but I believe it to be more than a case of human error or interpretation. I think the truth often doesn't make sense and thus either appears to contradict itself or it chooses to do so in given circumstances. Now I know that doesn't make sense, so I will return to explain when I can. Love ya!

Leesa said...

You made the statement, "There’s another contradiction through what the Catholics believe, opposed to some Christians." And the thought was left dangling. Here I was ready to defend Catholics, and I could find nothing to defend. Some Catholics believe that you can talk in tongues (what the next few sentences related to). Also, the laying of hands. Charasmatic Catholics - something I know very little about.

You know, there are contradictions in every part of our lives, really. Well, different points of view. The Bible was not written by one person or at one time in history - that may be a sourse of many of the contridictions.

~Deb said...

Ty: Good point. We’re all “brothers and sisters”, therefore committing incest…or thought to be.

Enemy of the republic: …” but I believe it to be more than a case of human error or interpretation.” With that being said on your part, do you feel that it’s possible that the people who wrote the bible, wrote it in “error”?

Leesa: The thought was, “speaking in tongues”---whether one believes in that or not. It was left dangling, I will correct that---sorry! I didn't mean to offend the Catholics, I'm just asking a question of whether or not speaking in tongues is a belief that we should have---or should we believe that no one can possibly talk in tongues? A friend of mine, who is Catholic, believes that we aren't able to talk in tongues--yet the bible clearly states that God does give this gift to some people.

Art said...

I've struggled with these contradictions for years. I resolved this (with the help of a very wise pastor) by understanding the Bible as metaphor and symbolic truth rather than (exclusively) a literally true document.

Gary Baker said...

Take the parts in context, both in the particular verse and surrounding verses, and in the context of the entire Bible.

For example:

“So this is the point: The law no longer holds you in its power, because you died to its power when you died with Christ on the cross.”

Who is Paul writing to? Believers. This is indicated by mentioning that they have died with Christ on the cross (and in the context of the book of Romans). What is the "power" of the law? The law is the standard for judgment for those not under grace. If we accept Christ, we are under grace, and the law cannot condemn us. However, the law still points out the difference between right and wrong. If we do things contrary to the law, then we sin. It is not a sin that will condemn us, but it will still affect our relationship with God. Sin makes us unsuitable for service or blessing, and carries consequences from damaged health to lost relationships to you name it. Just because our sins will no longer condemn us to hell is no reason to continue in them.

Did you ever see the movie "Office Space"? There was one scene in there where a restaurant manager is having a discussion with Jennifer Anniston's character about her lack of "flare" (flare in this case being the number of decorative pins she wears on her restaurant uniform.) She was wearing the minimum required, and he asked her the question "Is that what how you want to be known, as someone who just does the minimum?" (I'll admit right now that's not an exact quote, but I think it captures the spirit of scene closely.) It's a stupid issue, trumped up in a comedy, but there is a valid point there.

There is a wide spectrum of believers as far as how much they trust or adhere to the scripture. On the one end, there are the people that have accepted Christ as savior, but not Lord. They have their fire insurance and they love God, but they are not going to take a chance on him cramping their style too much. Basically, if it's written a dozen times in big bold letters as "Really, really, evil," they'll stay clear of it. Aside from that, they'll do things their way, thank you very much and if others don't like it they can pack sand. They will parse and question every scripture that restricts what they want to do, emphasize some, ignore others, and give themselves permission to everything, because "After all, who can really say what is true?"

On the other end, you have the believer that has truly "died to self." They have accepted Christ not just as savior, but as Lord. In all things, they strive to please him and follow his ways. They don't look for how close they can come to breaking a rule and still be in the clear. Their emphasis is how far away can they stay from sin.

I don't know of anyone completely on one end or the other. It's a continuum. I'm a long way from the end that I want to be on, but I know this: The closer I move to the "Christ is Lord" end, the more the "contradictions" are resolved in context and completeness of the scripture. The more I move toward the other end, the less certain that I am of anything regarding scripture, and the less effective I am as a Christian. And with that, the joy, the peace, and the relationships start going down, down, down. Take it for what it's worth. Which end do you want to be on?

~Deb said...

Art: I’ve thought about looking into seeing a pastor about these questions myself. I hope it gave you comfort and ended the debate within your mind. That’s great!

Gary: I definitely remember the scene of that movie. Great reference to your point!

When you said, ”… They will parse and question every scripture that restricts what they want to do, emphasize some, ignore others, and give themselves permission to everything, because "After all, who can really say what is true?"

How can we learn about the bible and God, if we don’t ask questions? Is it wrong to question the scriptures and ask what they truly mean? If you look at the examples I gave in my post, you can see very contradicting scriptures that don’t make sense when read together. Each scripture applies to certain situations---but shouldn’t the wide spectrum of the meaning itself hold the same? This is where I get really confused. I’m not trying to be “rebellious” just because of my lifestyle, I’m truly seeking answers, which I think is a good idea, instead of just going by man’s word alone. Haven’t we gone by man’s word alone for 2,000 years now? What about “God’s word”? And how do we know it’s God’s word through teachings of man? What about other people’s teachings who has thought to be false prophets?

Enemy of the Republic said...

No, I don't believe the Bible was written in error, strictly speaking. There was no intentionality to create a monothesitic God who came off kindly in one book and ferocious in the other. Granted, there are some bad translations of the original tongue; most people read the Bible in translation so they are reliant on the translator's skill. The King James was an awful translation; we know that now, yet does that mean that it failed to minister to people in time of need? That brings me to my next point--the search for truth.

If we rely solely on a text for our understanding of truth, then we will only see in part. If truth as you imply, is of the spirit, then we see through the spirit. I am still working this one myself, so bear with me! But to me, truth is a bit like love; if you constantly question it, then it probably isn't what you think it is. It is something or somewhere else. I can reconcile the angry God with the loving one--as a child I could not--because that sums up humanity. Does that mean I believe in every miracle that took place in the bible? Honestly, I no longer question them--miracle is irrelevant to me; mystery is not. And God is mystery--if he were clear, then why would Jesus seek out time to be alone with him, why did so many saints need to pray and fast? I think that understand God means we tune out much of our intellect and our senses because they can betray us. I call myself a Christian, but many do not see me as such. I am a sinner in need of God's grace. I am an example of the sick needing the doctor. But I grant you that I am fairly unorthodox in my approach--sorry so long!

~Dawn C said...

This is how I look at the contradictions in the bible
Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 (http://tinyurl.com/ysdm5l)
There is a time for everything under heaven.

As for the views on God, I would say the same thing, but say it about you.

Would you classify yourself as always hostile, angry, impatient and biased? NO
You are also loving, merciful, patient and tolerant. Because of this, you are not a 2-d person, you are a complete person.

In the bible we see a 2-d picture of God as well, but inside that 2-d picture we also enter into a world of God that has more dimensions to it than a diamond. There are even times people can't explain it. (With the book of Revelations and the author's description of everything as if he were playing charades with us... sounds like, looks like, etc

Gary Baker said...

Deb,

By all means, we are supposed to ask questions. The questions that we ask and how we ask them can make a world of difference to our answer, though. Look at some of the questions you've asked:

"How can it be just one truth?"

"Which one is the truth?"

"Which laws still apply today?"

Now, I know that you are a believer and a seeker after truth. Go back to some of the basics that you know about God. What does he desire from us? A relationship, certainly. A what can that relationship be based on, since usually we can't see, hear, or touch God? I would think then that our relationship would have to be based to a great extent on faith. There are times when I am certain that I have felt God and even heard God, but those are not the norm for me. Perhaps others are more blessed, but most of the time I rely on faith.

Okay, so if I have faith in God, what does that mean? What do I have faith in? Do I have faith that he has saved me and redeemed me? I do! Do I have faith that he has a plan for me and what's to prosper me? I do. So if I have faith that he wants to do good things for me, I have to have faith that he has made provision for me. I also have to believe that he has left instructions so that I can walk in light and not darkness. And where are those instructions? Christ said they were in the scriptures. Paul said they were in the scriptures. Moses said they were in the scriptures. If I have faith in Christ, I have to believe that the answers are in the scriptures. If I want to find the answers then, I need to approach the scriptures with the same faith I profess to have in God.

Instead of asking:

"How can it be just one truth?"

Ask "Since I know that Christ proclaimed that the Spirit would lead me into truth, what is the truth God wants me to get from his word."

Instead of asking as though disbelieving "How can both of these be true?," ask "God, please lead me into wisdom so that I can understand your word." Ask believing that it is true, and then let God show you how it is so.

Now you mentioned some scriptures that you believe to be honest contradictions in your post. Please let me at least make a stab at resolving one of them:

"Matthew 32:17 (Jesus says) “Blind fools!”

Opposing scripture:
But I say, if you are angry with someone, you are subject to judgment! If you call someone an idiot, you are in danger of being brought before the high council. And if you curse someone, you are in danger of the fires of hell. ~Matthew 5:22"

We'll start with the second one: Christ is warning about the severity of sin, and how anger can lead us into it. He is also warning about judging others. He points out in other scriptures that we are not to judge. Why? Because that is God's perogative. We have not the wisdom nor the authority.

So what of Christ? Does he sin by calling the pharisees fools? If he is only a man, then I would have to say yes. But is he only a man? Does he not proclaim himself Lord of the Sabbath? Does he not say that all authority has been given to him by the Father, that he and the Father are one? (And that "one" is the same "one" mentioned in the commandment "Hear Oh Israel, the Lord your God is one..."

So, if he were only a man, that would be sin. But since He is God, a God that scriptures say is sinless, how could it be sin? It is simply God being...God.

Going back to the Proverb you quoted, do you honestly think the depression being discussed was someone who would be diagnosed as "clinically depressed?" Isn't it far more likely and correct that the type of depression referred to is the kind of sadness that can come from the stress of life, and be temporarily relieved by a glass of wine or so? Don't try to make it hard for the scriptures to agree. Treat them as pieces of a puzzle that you know really does fit together. Examine each one next to the others. Look for the ways they can fit together rather than the ways that they can't.

"Haven’t we gone by man’s word alone for 2,000 years now?"

Have we? I believe my God is able. I believe he was able to appoint his prophets according to his will, and have them submit to his authority in the writing of his word. And I believe in the end he was able to have assembled into the Bible his true and sufficient message. Note, I do not say complete message, for God is always at work. But I believe that we have all that we need for an earthly lifetime of lessons. I believe that though some may have tried to sabotage the scriptures with false doctrine, they have failed, because God is sovereign. If I did not believe that, then how could I believe any of it? If God is not powerful enough to preserve his true word, then how could he be powerful enough to save a wretch like me. To find everything that God wants to say to you within the scriptures, the first thing you have to do is put away doubt and say "Alright, God, I trust in you, no matter what." Once you take that step of faith, there is no end to what God wants to say to you.

kathi said...

I always wonder about things I read that contradict, in my understanding, anyway. I do a lot of word studies using Strong's Concordance. A valuable tool if you're interested.

Another thought provoking post darlin, hugs!

Sometimes Saintly Nick said...

Deb, what Christians and preachers told you that if we don’t obey the law, then we’ll end up in eternal damnation? They were Mainline Protestants—at least they shouldn’t be!

I’ll not attempt to exegete all those texts you referred to! I will say that there are a lot on contradictions in the canonized scriptures as well as those that aren’t canonized. Discerning truth—truth for you, not necessarily for everyone because it’s hard enough for one soul to travel the path much less try to control the journey of other souls—is the primary purpose of theology (‘God talk’).

Blessings and shalom, my dear Deb

Lisa said...

Wow... good stuff! Good post! Good comments! I've been really, truly wrestling with this for awhile, too.. Deb and Gary (and everyone else, too) are making really excellent points that are making me think. This is an intriguing conversation.

Ricardo said...

Deb, thanks for the kind words over on my little corner of the blogosphere.

Speaking of all this biblical stuff, my synagogue is meeting with a Congregationalist church across the street to discuss the story of Abraham and how each side sees it. Will there be fireworks?

Seriously they are very nice people and it should be interesting on how it all pans out.

Hope you are well.

Grimly Fiendish said...

A very good post and an interesting point of view. I also put my religious views on my blog. I dont think it was as well written or charitable though. :)

~Deb said...

Enemy of the Republic: The reason for my madness is, I’m trying to seek answers from those who feel that the literal text is just “one truth”. When I open up the bible, I pray beforehand and receive messages from what I read. It may have nothing to even do with the story itself, or it may have everything to do with the story- but all in all, it’s what the Spirit tells me. I totally understand the differences in the scriptures about the wine- when to drink, who should drink it and the moderation of it all. It’s all about discernment. But when does it get to a point when the literal text has been generated into all truth? Jesus was unorthodox, that’s why he was persecuted. Don’t ever apologize for leaving a long comment----I always learn something new from you! Thanks!!!

Dawn C: It is all about “you”. I truly believe God speaks to us on many levels. Why would He give the same message to direct everyone to do the same thing? You made a great point! Thanks, Dawn!

Gary: ”…What does he desire from us? A relationship, certainly.” With my faith, I truly believe that the Spirit talks to me through the bible, even though some of these scriptures are contradictory. I “understand” it through “discernment”. But that’s my “discernment”. What makes it different for everyone? A different loving relationship that people have with God. I don’t think they’re the same for every person. Each person plays a crucial role in life- whether that means spreading the message of God, helping others with their struggles, or some other mission that God has set forth for us.

…”I also have to believe that he has left instructions so that I can walk in light and not darkness. And where are those instructions? Christ said they were in the scriptures. Paul said they were in the scriptures. Moses said they were in the scriptures. If I have faith in Christ, I have to believe that the answers are in the scriptures. If I want to find the answers then, I need to approach the scriptures with the same faith I profess to have in God.”

The instructions are left with contradictions for many people. I see them as “one truth” for me. So what makes my belief wrong, and another belief right? If they’re all in the scriptures, then why isn’t it clear? Why are people still debating over it? If no one can come to a conclusion, then aren’t we supposed to solely rely on the relationship with God and His messages that He sends to us?

As far as calling “names”, if God is sinless, and Jesus is God, then why would he “sin” by calling people “blind fools”? Wouldn’t that be hypocritical?

…”Isn't it far more likely and correct that the type of depression referred to is the kind of sadness that can come from the stress of life, and be temporarily relieved by a glass of wine or so?”

If psychiatrists around the world are suggesting their clients to not pick up a glass of wine, due to their depression (which we all know comes from the stressors of this world), then what makes it any different?

”…I believe that though some may have tried to sabotage the scriptures with false doctrine, they have failed, because God is sovereign.”

False doctrine---in whose eyes? Just because somebody believes differently---or better yet, interprets the scriptures the way the Spirit tells them to, then who’s to say if it’s wrong or right? That’s the question I’m trying to ask throughout this whole post. I appreciate what you’re trying to tell me, but understand that I truly seek answers, because the Holy Spirit has told me some awesome things that I simply cannot shake off. When people tell me ‘I’m wrong’, it just makes me wonder…”What makes you say such a thing if the Spirit tells me this?” My beliefs aren’t far off from what many Christians believe, however, there are messages within the bible that conclude in a much different way for me.
Thank you for your input, Gary. I really appreciate the time you gave me.

Kathi: I’d definitely be interested in learning more about Strong’s Concordance. I’ll email you! Thank you Kath!!! xxoo

Nick: I couldn’t have said that better myself! Truth for “me”, and truth for “you”. It’s all good. Thank you for stopping by!

Lisa: They all contribute with such amazing input! This is why I ask so many questions…or bug them with so many questions!

Ricardo: Congrats on your reward! They’ll definitely be fireworks with that discussion! But, you never know, the way people approach certain issues affects the flow of the conversation. Good luck!!!

Grimly Fiendish: Nothing wrong with sharing your views with the world. As long as it helped you, it may have helped somebody else. Thanks for stopping by!

QUASAR9 said...

Laws of Men are made by Men.
Being right with the laws of men, does not make one right.
Thus Apartheid and the law of apartheid fell.

However Deb, I presume:
1) Though shall not steal
2) Thought shall not kill
and laws to address these are necessary.

Now I'm bot very up on these things, but I think the notion would be that we do not steal or kill, NOT simply because it is against the Law, but because we would not do it even if there were no law ...

After all there is little point if we carry the errors of humans or the sins of the flesh, to a higher place ... else heaven will be just as much a mess as earth.

I would hope sugar does not give one toothache in heaven, but then if there is no sugar and no teeth, then there is no tooth decay

I would hope there are no hangovers in heaven, but then if there is no strong drink and no pohysical head (or brain), then there'll be little drinking of the sort which would give a hangover

But on earth we like to have our cake and eat it, or make merry for tomorrow we die. For the only thing we know for sure, is the body will age, decay and die - and no law of men, nor all the kings horses and all the kings men seem able to change that fact.

In the meantime we eat, and drink, and dance and sleep, and learn which way to turn, which way to sway, and to bend with the wind
And hope we make it thru to another day

Gary Baker said...

Deb,

"With my faith, I truly believe that the Spirit talks to me through the bible, even though some of these scriptures are contradictory. I “understand” it through “discernment”. But that’s my “discernment”. What makes it different for everyone?"

I think that all of us show differences in our relationships. With some people we chat about one topic, another person we might do little but go shopping or to ball games. We relate to different individuals in different ways according to our temperament. In the same way, God relates to people differently through the Spirit. But there are parts of our character that we cannot change, regardless of who we are relating to. These things relate our immutable character, the things that we show the same to everyone. So this part can be like the scriptures, which reveal the parts of God's character that he wants everyone to know and understand.

"If no one can come to a conclusion, then aren’t we supposed to solely rely on the relationship with God and His messages that He sends to us?"

And if someone came up to you and said that God has revealed in his scriptures that it has been given to him to execute Holy judgment and kill any sinner that he meets, would you believe that? Or would you say that contradicts the message of the scriptures that it is for God to judge, and that he has delegated to earthly authorities to enforce the law?

Again, search the scriptures with the idea of how you can find harmony within all of them. For example, a lot of people get really hung up about capital punishment. Many of them cite the scripture "Thou shall not kill." That would be a powerful argument, were it not for the fact that God killed people directly in the Old and New Testament, and directed others to do the same. So, is this a contradiction? Not if you take the total scriptures into account. God describes in the scriptures what appropriate punishments are and gives examples under different conditions. For the crime of murder, he says to kill the offender, even if you have to drag them away from the altar. So what is translated "You shall not kill" can be more accurately related as "You shall not murder," or take an innocent life.

"As far as calling “names”, if God is sinless, and Jesus is God, then why would he “sin” by calling people “blind fools”? Wouldn’t that be hypocritical?"

Why are we told to refrain from "name calling"? Could it be perhaps because that is a form of judgment? That we do not have the right or competency to determine if someone should be judged a fool or not? Now if that's the case, tell me: Does God have the right and competency? I think he does. So if we do so, we take on the prerogative of God, which is a sin.

"False doctrine---in whose eyes? Just because somebody believes differently---or better yet, interprets the scriptures the way the Spirit tells them to, then who’s to say if it’s wrong or right?"

In whose eyes? That's the question, isn't it? Tell me: How do you it's the Spirit of God speaking, when you read the scriptures? What if it is a deceiving Spirit? Isn't it the scriptures that give you insight and instruction into the character of God? For if you don't have that, again, you don't really know what God is supposed to be like, do you?

If God gave scriptures that truly could not be reconciled to themselves, then he would be a God of confusion. Do you believe that? If not, then where do you think the fault lies? Within God, or within man?

And on the matter depression and alcohol, I haven't gone back to the Greek on this one, but I would wager that if I did the translation would relate a lot more to melancholy that a medical diagnosis.

I've been having some discussions on the side with Dr. Kate, and one of the points that she has brought up is that why would God give her a mind if he didn't intend for her to use it. At least one answer that I offer at this point is that it takes that gift of a mind and Godly wisdom to accept and reconcile the truth and harmony of the scriptures, and then to truly dig the depths of his Word for everything there.

Gary Baker said...

Deb,

One more response that I wanted to add. To your comments:

"If they’re all in the scriptures, then why isn’t it clear? Why are people still debating over it?"

I can give you at least three good reasons.

The first is ignorance of the scriptures among believers in general. A great example of this is modern Greece. If you polled people in the country, greater than 90% of them would claim to be Christian. If you asked the same people if they had ever read the Bible, just parts, not the whole thing, the response level would be down below 5%. Even in the states, a large number of denominations place little to no emphasis on studying the scriptures.

The second is that we have an enemy, and he delights in deceiving the believers by twisting the word of God. His first deception in the garden was misquoting the word of God. He continues to this day. He actually has many believers that Christ never pointed out people's sins to them, even though he did this so often to the Pharisees that they wanted to kill him.

The third is the fallen nature that has been with us since birth. This is the one that Christ gives us the power to defeat, but few do. Many are content not even to try seriously, being more comfortable living as they did before salvation. This is the voice inside that speaks bold rebellion or gentle rationalization. This is the voice that says that we are right, regardless of the evidence to the contrary.

These are the agents of dissention in the Christian church. We are each given the choice on how we choose to deal with them. For my part, I will rest on the Word of God.

Anonymous said...

Keep reading the bible, spend time in prayer, pray for guidance when it comes to scriptures that may not make sense at first and keep a dictionary close by and look up words, even if you think you know its meaning.

Doug